Planning For Disaster

Early Childhood Education Programs

Tips#1: Read Together Every Day
Read to your child every day. Make this a warm and loving time when the two of you can cuddle close together. Bedtime is an especially great time for reading together.
Tips#2: Give Everything A Name
You can build comprehension skills early, even with the littlest child. Play games that involve naming or pointing to objects. Say things like, "Where's your nose?" and then, "Where's Mommy's nose?" Or touch your child's nose and say, "What's this?"

In recent months and years, we have been impressed by the bravery demonstrated by child-care workers at the Pentagon, World Trade Center, and the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City.While the chance that an event of this extent will occur again is very small, it is essential that we take this chance to assess the emergency measures we have in place and make improvements anywhere we find a gap in our plans. Here are some basic strategy for evaluating both the content of your plan, and the plan's realistic function.

1. Identify Your Resources
all certified early childhood education programs are mandatory to have plans for dealing with a fire, a natural tragedy such as a tornado, or an outbreak of a transferable illness. Your plan might have been developed in cooperation with local emergency personnel, or it might have already been in place when you assumed responsibility for your facility. Now is an outstanding time for you to expand personal associations with the emergency workers-firefighters, police officers, public health workers, etc.-who would most likely answer to your facility in the event of a crisis. Your insurance company would also be a brilliant resource. Neighborhood resources, such as area businesses, schools, and other early learning facilities can also be essential to the victory of your plan. At last, local trade relations, such as your state's child care organization or Family Daycare Provider's Group, and the National Safety Council can be a resource for you in ensuring that you will get the support you need in the occasion of an emergency.

2. Develop Your Plan
as you expand or purify your plan; be certain that you follow all appropriate state and local policy. Try not to make your plan so compound that people won't be able to remember the required steps when faced with a crisis situation. Simple and successful plans should include:

a. Identifying a primary evacuation site for your facility. This is possibly a building or site that is open to the public during your hours of process and is within a short walking distance of your facility. In the event that a tragedy would hit the entire area nearby your facility, it is sensible to identify a secondary evacuation site. Be sure you get in touch with with the management of your primary and secondary evacuation sites during the course of a year to be sure that your chosen sites will be accessible to you.

b. Preparing an emergency duffle bag for each classroom. Take account of items such as bottled water, paper cups, snacks (crackers, dried fruit, or formula), a battery-operated radio and extra batteries, a blanket, first aid supplies, and current emergency contact information for each child and member of staff. Be sure the duffle bag is visibly marked and is not too heavy, so that staff can effortlessly take it with them if they have to empty their classroom.

Tips#3: Say How Much You Enjoy Reading Together
Tell your child how much you enjoy reading with him or her. Look forward to this time you spend together. Talk about "story time" as the favorite part of your day.
Tips#4: Be Interactive
Engage your child so he or she will actively listen to a story. Discuss what's happening, point out things on the page, and answer your child's questions. Ask questions of your own and listen to your child's responses.

c. Ensuring that you have current emergency contact information for each child. This information should contain both home and work numbers for parents and others who are authorized to pick up a child, email addresses, cell phone numbers, and a photo of the child. The Red Cross also suggests that you have an out-of-town contact number for each child, so that if phone lines are down in the parents' work area someone within the family's association could be contacted with announcement that the child is safe and sound. The family would also know that they would call this out of town contact for updated information.

d. Identifying a local radio or television station to be your basis of broadcast communications. When parents register in your program, they should be told to adjust into this channel or station to get emergency information.

3. Communicate Your Plan
Now that your plan has been improved to cover a wide scope of emergencies, it's very essential that you communicate the plan's workings to all suitable individuals, including staff members and emergency personnel. Both your primary and secondary evacuation sites need to be notified about the role they would play, and they need to have a print of your plan. Be sure you have a reliable contact at your chosen evacuation sites, so that message can remain clear at all times. Parents also need to be well educated about your preparation for an emergency situation. This typically occurs during the enrollment/intake process, but it cannot be recurring often enough during the course of a child's stay with you. Newsletters email, and parent meetings can all be efficient methods for communicating any changes or updates to your emergency plans.

4. Practice Your Plan
certified pre primary teacher training course in mumbai advises day care centers to practice their emergency plans on a usual basis, and in most cases, they must document the working accomplishment of their plan (how long it took to evacuate the building, etc.). It's always a good idea to have unplanned practices so that your staff and children get used to reacting speedily whenever a crisis occurs. Be sure that your practice sessions contain an actual visit to your evacuation site or sites. Keep in mind that when you have a change in staff, you need to share your plan for emergencies during course.
After a practice session, it's very important to plan a “debriefing” session with your staff. Talk with them about what worked well, and where you need to still get better your plan. You could also engross parents in one of your practice/debriefing sessions so they would see direct how well prepared you are for any tragedy event. It is also sensible to request emergency personnel to contribute in one of your practice sessions. They are generally very keen to be of help in this way, and they often have superb tips for improving the speed and efficiency of your evacuation.

Conclusion:
It is very important that children are made aware of the dangers of natural disasters. Programs should be conducted to make children prepare for the disaster that may occur. This program will help children become more aware of their environment and encourages them to share their knowledge with their parents and families.

Tips#5: Read It Again And Again And Again
Your child will probably want to hear a favorite story over and over. Go ahead and read the same book for the 100th time! Research suggests that repeated readings help children develop language skills.
Tips#6: Talk About Writing, Too
Draw your child's attention to the way writing works. When looking at a book together, point out how we read from left to right and how words are separated by spaces.
Updated: November 15, 2017 — 4:43 am
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